Slip and Fall Accidents

Slip and Falls

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In the Province of Ontario, owners of property and tenants are mandated to keep their property in a reasonable state to allow persons to safely walk or pass. There are hundreds of accidents that occur each day where persons fall or trip due to poor or substandard maintenance or repairs. The fall or trips that result in injuries may result in compensation.

 

Common cases of slip and fall accidents are:

  1. Uneven walkway surfaces. Generally uneven protrusions in a walkway if greater than 3/4's of an inch will entitle a person to claim for compensation.
  2. Ice and snow build up on walkway. In Ontario, there is an obligation to keep walkways free of ice and snow build ups or to treat these surfaces with salt and sand. Generally, it is expected that both residential and commercial owners or tenants, within a reasonable period of time (6 to 12 hours), will remove the snow and ice or treat such with salt and sand. The obligation is higher for commercial areas during normal business hours.
  3. Faulty or Improper Construction.
  4. Hazards. Man made or naturally occurring hazards must be corrected or properly barricaded. Hazzards would include but not be limited to trenches, holes, construction areas, scaffolding and fallen trees.
  5. Potholes. A problem in Ontario is the occurrence of potholes in parking lots and walkways. These need to be repaired or barricaded when they are no longer safe for travel by pedestrians, carts, or vehicles.

Free 30 Minute Consultation

If you have a question related to a slip and fall accident, please contact us at (613) 544-1482 to set up a 30 minute free consultation. This 30 minute free consultation either by phone or in person will provide you with valuable legal information related to your ability to make a successful claim for compensation.

Read 2172 times Last modified on Wednesday, 14 January 2015 21:42

Tips to prepare for your legal suit

Tips to Aid Your Slip and Fall Accident Claim

It is important to keep in mind that each case is dependant on the facts that can be proven. As a result, the following are useful tips:

1.  Pictures:                    
Take a picture of the hazard or unsafe area as close to the time of the accident as possible - this is worth at least 1,000 words. Often claims of unsafe or hazardous conditions depend, to a large degree, on what the hazardous or unsafe condition looks like at the time of the fall or accident. Further, pictures of the injury that result (ie broken leg, ankle, or wrist in the cast) is also very helpful to show the extent of the injury.

2.   Witnesses: 
The names and contact information of any witnesses to the fall or accident.             

3.  Measurements: 
Many of the unsafe conditions will be proven by proving the conditions did not meet an accepted standard (ie. displaced sidewalk slab greater than 3/4 inch, pot hole deeper than 2 inches or inadequate barricade).

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